Facebook Gone Wrong: A quick sample from Nestlé


Late last week Nestlé gave us a great example of how quickly things can get out of control when you don’t stop to THINK about what you’re saying!

How NOT to respond, unless you want a fire fight on your hands…

Status update from Nestlé: “To repeat- we welcome your comments, but please don’t post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic – they will be deleted.”

Notice the box directly under the profile picture…

“Social media: as you can see we’re learning as we go. Thanks for the comments.”

In my opinion, that is not a great way to acknowledge your flub. Considering that Social Media, while maturing, is still in it’s infancy we’re all really still learning (I’m looking at you, “gurus”). One thing that isn’t new however, is common sense and common decency.

Nestle To repeat- we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic - they will be deleted. | Facebook

Nestle To repeat- we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic - they will be deleted. | Facebook

The original Facebook status update that started it all

The original Facebook status update that started it all

How do you think this should have been (or should continue to be) handled. I plan to post an update on this situation soon and would love to hear your thoughts as it unfolds. For more background I recommend taking a look at the source in which I first caught wind of this.

Quick update: Since taking the screenshot above Nestlé’s fan count has jumped to 93,176 fans over the weekend…marketing ploy? Maybe…but I really doubt it.

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One response to “Facebook Gone Wrong: A quick sample from Nestlé

  1. This shows that Nestle do not have a clue.

    First up, they don’t have the authority to remove or interfere with other people’s profiles or pics. This is a big laugh for the rest of us up here in the cheap seats.

    Secondly, like most of Corporate America, they appear to have a fundamental misunderstanding of the spirit of Trademarks. Their purpose is to prevent someone from impersonating them in business. If this is not the case, they need to relax.

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